Price 431

Tail Width
Waist width


Nose width

Technical components
Back to list
Monstre Powder
Ski Length

Dimensions
Nose width
145mm
138mm
Waist Width
110mm
120mm
Tail Width
128mm
124mm
Front Rocker
82mm
82mm
Rear Rocker
18mm
30mm
For Terminology Guide please see below
Terminology Guide
Length
Generally the taller you are the longer ski that you want. This also has to be balanced with your skiing ability. Longer skis are a little harder to turn than shorter ones but a 6ft beginner will probably require a longer ski than a 5 ft 4 ins beginner in order to get the right balance when skiing. As a general rule for beginners, a man of average height (5ft 10 ins) would suit a ski between 165cm and 175cm. A woman of average height (5ft 5 ins) would be more likely to go for a ski of between 155cm and 165cm. The type of skiing you do will also affect the length of ski, speed skiers will usually have longer skis.
Rocker
The rocker is the part of the ski that lifts off the ground and the measurement of it is between the part that sits on the ground and the nose of the ski. A rocker can be at the front and rear of a ski. The larger the measurement of the rocker the easier it will be to turn, particularly off piste as it helps the ski to sit higher up in the snow. A ski with a long rocker (over 40mm) at front or back would mean that quite a lot of the ski would not be sitting on the snow and you may therefore want to increase your ski length slightly in comparison to the typical length stated above.


Width
The width of a ski is measured at the nose and the tail at the widest point and the waist at the narrowest point. If the ski has a high difference (30-40mm) between the waist and the nose/tail it will be easier to turn and is generally better for beginners. Straighter skis with less than 25mm are generally quicker but more difficult to turn.
Ski Length
181cm
191cm
Radius
25m
29m
Weight
3.5kg
3.8kg
Radius
The radius is the measurement of how big a circle would be if the ski was put on the floor and you drew a line along the edge. If you continued this line past the ski at the same gradient, a circle would eventually be drawn based on the bottom of the ski.  It effectively measures the turning circle and therefore the lower the radius, the shorter the turns that the ski can make. A speed ski will have a longer radius. A ski of less than 12 metres will be considered a very short radius and therefore very easy to turn. Over 22 metres would be a long-turning ski. Anything inbetween would be considered within the medium range but obviously potentially towards either end of the scale.
Width
The width of a ski is measured at the nose and the tail at the widest point and the waist at the narrowest point. If the ski has a high difference (30-40mm) between the waist and the nose/tail it will be easier to turn and is generally better for beginners. Straighter skis with less than 25mm are generally quicker but more difficult to turn.
Core material
Most skis will be a hardwood core (Spruce, Maple, Poplar, Paulownia, Birch etc) and if well created this is an excellent centre for the ski. Wood is flexible and has good at damping vibrations from skiing, therefore added to comfort. It is also relatively inexpensive in comparison to others. More expensive skis are made sometimes from Carbon, Kevlar or Titanium.


Sidewall Construction
ABS sidewalls are where the side of the ski is quite flat and the aim of the sidewall is to protect the core. They are slightly heavier than a Capped sidewall but more resistant to the ski being damaged. It also is designed to enabled quicker turning as pressure is more easily transmitted to the edges.
Base material
Most bases are made of a polyethylene plastic (Ptex). The number represents the molecular weight of the polythylene. A high number suggests and better and more durable base. Skis are usually created with a Ptex of between 2000 and 6000. A Ptex of 2000 will be at greater risk from being damaged and therefore would need servicing more frequently and the life of the ski will be much shorter. Skis with a carbon base will be faster and more durable than polyethylene due to the reduced friction and the fact that it can hold more wax.
If you need further help in choosing skis, try these links below or by all means contact us with any questions you have.
Composite Layers
These are the layers that surround the core of the ski. Most commonly this is fibreglass and due to its flexibility and strength as this is one of the main factors in the construction of a strong yet flexible ski. For fibreglass layers there is a Bi-axial wrap where the glass fibre strands are weaved at right angles to each other. A Tri-axial wrap will have fibres woven together in 3 different angles which provides an additional strength and flex advantage.
Wide Steel Edge
This is a feature of how the ski is edged and offers protection against damage, particularly at the tips. The wide steel edge is where one strip of metal goes around the whole ski rather than just at the sides. This offers strength to the ski but with slightly more weight.
http://www.mechanicsofsport.com/skiing/equipment.html
http://www.evo.com/how-to-choose-skis-size-chart-and-guide.aspx
http://www.skis.com/Buying-Guide-for-Skis/buying-guide
Contact us
Home
Buy skis
Bindings
Accessories
Monoskis
Binding fixings
The majority of our skis will have reinforced fixings for the bindings. This simply means that it is extremely unlikely that a binding will come away from the ski unless under severe impact. Cheaper skis don't always have these and it does occasionally happen to see a binding simply slide off a ski which is not ideal when moving.
This is a ski for intermediate and advanced skiers who like nothing better than to get up early, go high and enjoy the powder, whatever the ski conditions. It is designed to keep you on top of the snow and turn easily giving you the stylish look that you want when skiing powder.